Undergraduate Programs

Why CIS at UD?

The diverse interests of our faculty gives students a wide range of courses from which to choose. Because classes typically have no more than 40 students, students benefit from a high level of interaction with their professors. Our undergraduate concentrations allow majors to pursue related interests in line with their career goals, from artificial intelligence to technical writing and more. Students are strongly encouraged to get involved in undergraduate research through independent studies and funded research experiences, with the goal of learning from internationally recognized scholars outside the classroom and participating in the exciting quest for new contributions to the field. In the last few years, student research activity has led to national recognition by the Computing Research Association for five of our majors! Our faculty are active researchers and superb teachers who devote extensive time and effort to educating, mentoring, and advising students. Eight of our faculty have been awarded the prestigious university-wide Excellence-in-Teaching Award, which is given to only four faculty each year among the over 1000 faculty at the University of Delaware.

Why pursue a career in Computer and Information Science?

From its inception just a half century ago, computing has become the defining technology of our age. Computers are integral to modern culture and are the primary engine behind much of the world’s economic growth. Moreover, the field continues to evolve at an astonishing pace, making computer science increasingly important with each passing day.

The Department of Computer and Information Sciences (CIS) offers three majors:

BA in Computer Science

A more flexible liberal arts program, especially good for students double- or triple- majoring, or students who desire a technical undergraduate degree before attempting a professional degree (law, medical, business).

>> Computer Science Program Details
>> CS Curriculum and Careers [PDF]

BS in Computer Science

A technical course of study that emphasizes software development and computer theory with the goal that students learn how computers are used to solve real-life problems.

>> Computer Science Program Details
>> CS Curriculum and Careers [PDF]

BS in Information Systems

A combination of business and information technology subjects oriented toward students interested in the design of new software systems for business and consumer needs.

>> Information Systems Program Details
>> IS Curriculum and Careers [PDF]

Career Paths

  • Software Development
  • Software Engineering
  • Systems Analysis
  • Marketing

Facilities and Resources

The department is committed to providing students with access to the most advanced computer technology available and maintains research laboratories jointly with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, as well as separate research laboratories for subareas requiring extensive experimental studies.
Learn more about our facilities.

For Students

Academic Advisors
The CIS Department assigns a faculty advisor to each student having a major in the department. You are required to consult your advisor before each pre-registration period about your academic plans. Also, with the advice of your advisor you choose options, electives, and concentration within your major.

In some cases, students establish a working relationship with a faculty member other than their advisor and would like to have this mentor serve as official advisor. To change your advisor in such a case, ask your mentor if he or she is willing to act as your advisor. If agreed, your new advisor must inform the CIS Undergraduate Coordinator of the change.

Major advisors are listed in your UDSIS record. If the incorrect advisor is listed there, inform the CIS Undergraduate Coordinator.

For continuity, your advisor is assigned to you for the duration of your program. When a faculty advisor is on leave from the university, another advisor is assigned temporarily. Consult the CIS Office for temporary advisor information.

Students minoring in CIS may consult the Chair of the CIS Undergraduate Committee for choosing the electives in the minor.

Math Science Option Recommendations
The Bachelor of Science in Computer Science requires 30 (or more) credits in Mathematics and Science. This is summarized below with some specific information for the options within the Mathematics and Science requirements. Specific requirements call for

  • 12 credits in science including
    1. 8 credit two semester introductory sequence for science and engineering majors in one of
      • Physics (PHYS 207-208),
      • Chemistry (CHEM 103-104),
      • Biology (BISC 207-208),
      • Geology (GEOL 105-115-107).
    2. 4 other science credits. This may be an advanced course in the same science as your two semester introductory sequence or an initial course in a second science. Note that Physics 208 concerns electromagnetism, a topic central to understanding the operation of computer hardware. Note also that computation is becoming increasingly important in biology with “bioinformatics” and “computational biology” activity based on the increasingly automated sequencing and analysis of genetic material. CHEM 103/104 and BISC 207 are requirements of the computational biology minor.
  • 15 credits in Mathematics to include
    1. 8 credits of calculus (MATH 241, 242)
    2. 3 credits of discrete math (MATH 210)
    3. 4 or 3 credits of probability and statistics (MATH 205 or MATH 350).
  • 3 additional math or science credits selected from these two choices:
    1. CISC 304, Logic and Programming, prerequisite for CISC 403 program validation and CISC 481 Artificial Intelligence, good (but not required) preparation for CISC 437 databases.
    2. MATH 349, linear algebra, particularly relevant to graphics, cryptography, good (but not required) preparation for CISC372 parallel programming, CISC 410 Numerical Computation, CISC 440 Computer Graphics.
    3. Or, with prior written approval of your advisor, a course from this supplemental list, or a similar course with significant mathematical or scientific content, may be substituted. (This list may change from time to time).
      • MATH 302, differential equations, particularly relevant to scientific and engineering computation.
      • MATH 315, discrete mathematics II, particularly relevant to the design and analysis of algorithms.
      • MATH 451, abstract algebra, particularly relevant for cryptography, symbolic computation.
      • BISC 401 Molecular Biology of the Cell, in computational biology minor.
      • ANSC 644 Bioinformatics, in computational biology minor.
      • MAST 634 Marine Biochemistry, in computational biology minor.
Tutoring
Office of Academic Enrichment: (302-831-4555 | UD-aec@udel.edu)

The Office of Academic Enrichment provides tutoring services using departmental approved tutors. It is located on the corner of Amstel and S. College, across the street from Smith Hall.

  • Group tutoring sessions for courses such as CISC 106, 108, 181, 220, etc. are scheduled based on student interest. Early in the semester students can register with the Office of Academic Enrichment for group tutoring sessions. If enough students register, these sessions are provided as a free service to the students.
  • Additional individual tutoring sessions are generally available for courses such as CISC 106, 108, 181, 220.
Planned 2018-2019 Course Offerings

This is the timetable for CIS courses to be offered during the 2018-2019 academic year. Course offerings will be similar in subsequent years, with variations mostly limited to courses numbered 4xx and above.

COURSE NUMBERS 2018 FALL COURSE TITLES
CISC101 Principles of Computing
CISC103 Introduction to Computer Science with Web Applications
CISC106/CISC106H General Computer Science for Engineers
CISC108/CISC108H Introduction to Computer Science I
CISC181 Introduction to Computer Science II
CISC210 Introduction of Systems Programming
CISC220/CISC220H Data Structures
CISC260 Machine Organization and Assembly Language
CISC275 Introduction to Software Engineering
CISC303 Automata Theory
CISC304 Logic & Programming
CISC320 Introduction to Algorithms
CISC355 Computers, Ethics and Society
CISC356 Intellectual Property in the Digital Age
CISC357 Field Experiences in Teaching Computing
CISC360 Computer Architecture
CISC361 Operating Systems
CISC367 Introduction to Computer Science Research
CISC372 Parallel Computing
CISC410 Computational Mathematics I
CISC436 Computational Biology & Bioinformatics
CISC437 Database Systems
CISC442 Introduction to Computer Vision
CISC450 Computer Networks I
CISC453 Simulation of Computer Networks
CISC459 Topics in Communications, Distributed Computing and Networks: The Power of Networks
CISC467 Seminar: Malware Analysis
CISC467 Seminar: VIP:Cloud Cryptography
CISC467 Seminar: VIP: High-Performance Computing
CISC474 Advanced Web Technologies
CISC475/475H Advanced Software Engineering
CISC481 Artificial Intelligence
CISC483 Introduction to Data Mining
CISC489 Topics in Artificial Intelligence: AI in Games
COURSE NUMBERS 2019 WINTER SESSION COURSE TITLES
CISC101 Principles of Computing
CISC355 Computers, Ethics and Society
COURSE NUMBERS 2019 SPRING COURSE TITLES
CISC101 Principles of Computing
CISC103 Introduction to Computer Science with Web Applications
CISC106/CISC106H General Computer Science for Engineers
CISC108 Introduction to Computer Science I
CISC181/CISC181 Introduction to Computer Science II
CISC210 Introduction of Systems Programming
CISC220 Data Structures
CISC250 Business Telecommunications Networks
CISC260 Machine Organization and Assembly Language
CISC275 Introduction to Software Engineering
CISC303 Automata Theory
CISC304 Logic and Programming
CISC320 Introduction to Algorithms
CISC355 Computers, Ethics and Society
CISC357 Field Experiences in Teaching Computing
CISC361 Operating Systems
CISC372 Parallel Programming
CISC401 Elements of the Theory of Computation
CISC404 Logic in Computer Science
CISC411 Computational Mathematics I
CISC429 Topics Course
CISC437 Database Systems
CISC440 Computer Graphics
CISC449 Topics in Computer Applications
CISC450 Computer Networks I
CISC464 Introduction to Network Security
CISC465 Introduction to Cybersecurity
CISC467 Seminar: Game Design, Prototyping and Development
CISC467 Seminar: Physical Computing/E-Textiles
CISC467 Seminar: VIP: Cloud Cryptography
CISC467 Seminar: VIP: High-Performance Computing
CISC471 Compiler Design
CISC475/CISC475H Advanced Software Engineering
CISC481 Artificial Intelligence
CISC484 Machine Learning
CISC489 Topics in Artificial Intelligence
COURSE NUMBERS 2019 Summer Course Titles
CISC106 General Computer Science for Engineers
CISC181 Introduction to Computer Science II
CISC220 Data Structures
Transfer Credit
Transfer Credit for CISC101 is rarely given

CISC101 counts as a “group D” Math/Science credit for Arts and Science majors. Therefore, there is a “very high bar” for transfer credit for CISC101. To evaluate whether your course can be transferred as CISC101, a course description is not sufficient, and even a syllabus (if it is only a high level description) may not be enough. There needs to be clear and convincing evidence (e.g. sample homework assignments, exams) that the course went beyond simple applications such as MS Word, Excel and Powerpoint, and also included Math/Science content such as:

  1. digital representation of various kinds of information
  2. computer organization (sample topics: CPU, RAM, volatile vs. non-volatile storage)
  3. simple programming (e.g. in BASIC, JavaScript)

Most courses at other institutions do not meet these criteria, and even if they do, it is often difficult for students to gather and present sufficient evidence for us to be able to accept CISC101 for transfer.

However, if you feel that you can gather this evidence, contact the faculty member responsible for reevaluating transfer credits by email. (Right now that is Daniel Chester; his email address is User Name: chester and Domain Name: udel.edu.) In your email:

  • Put CISC101 transfer credit in the subject line.
  • Include a list of the evidence you have that the course you took contains sufficient math and science content as indicated above.
  • Include several times over the next week when you would be available for an appointment.

Transfer credit for courses other than CISC101:

If you are requesting transfer credit for a CIS course other than CISC101 often the CIS Department part can be handled by email.

Send an email to User Name: chester and Domain Name: udel.edu containing the following:

  1. Your full name (first middle last). Do NOT send your SSN (repeat…NO SSNs!)
  2. Name of school where you took the course
  3. Name/Number of the course you took
  4. When you took the course
  5. If known: what course you want to transfer it in to UD as.
  6. If you can find a web link to the course description from the other school, that is very helpful.

Student Organizations

Need help?  Have questions?

We recently launched our new website.

If you are unable to locate a resource or need assistance with an undergraduate academic program, please contact:

Samantha Fowle, Academic Advisor
fowle@udel.edu | 302-831-2712. 

Honors Options

Honors Degree

The Honors Degree recognizes student’s excellent performance in Honors coursework in and outside the primary major.

Degree with Distinction

The Degree with Distinction supplements regular departmental degree requirements by giving the student significant research experience while still an undergraduate. The candidate must complete six credits of thesis or project and give an oral and defense of the thesis or project to a faculty committee. The Degree with Distinction entails no change in the regular requirements of a student’s program other than research, writing, and defense of a senior thesis.

Honors Degree with Distinction

The Honors Degree with Distinction recognizes a student’s completion of the research requirements for the Degree with Distinction in addition to the successful pursuit of Honors coursework throughout the degree program. Six credits of Honors thesis may be counted as part of the 30 Honors credits required for the Honors Degree.

Specific requirements are outlined in the University catalog at requirements for the:

Academics Undergraduate Programs